Why Turmeric?

Scrub

We combine organic turmeric with other vegan, toxic-free skinfoods so you can fight acne, scarring, rosacea, uneven skin tone and facial hair growth.

Heart

Traditionally used during South Asian weddings in a fun, colourful ceremony that is believed to bring good luck, turmeric is well-respected as Ayurvedic medicine.

Turmeric Face Scrub

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Turmeric Face Mask

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Turmeric Face Elixir

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Turmeric Body Scrub

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Turmeric Skincare Kit

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Skincare

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Beauty Confession: My Fave Face Mask Is Made With a Cooking Spice

"Seriously, y’all, this stuff is the bomb. I’m obsessed AF. It works instantly; you can literally see a difference in your skin right after you wash it off. You’ll notice your complexion will have a brightness and radiance to it that improves with continued use. Blemishes will begin to disappear, wrinkles will smooth out and your skin tone will even out. I use this mask about twice a week and absolutely LOVE the results."

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Beauty Confession: My Fave Face Mask Is Made With a Cooking Spice

"Seriously, y’all, this stuff is the bomb. I’m obsessed AF. It works instantly; you can literally...

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The Natural Face Scrub People on Instagram Are Obsessed With

"[My skin was] crazy smooth thanks to the buffing action of the turmeric, chickpea flour, sea salt, and sugar—but not taut or dry. I followed up the treatment with a quick wash with my favorite gentle cleanser…and all traces of the yellow stains and the turmeric smell disappeared. In their wake was a glow-y, healthy-looking complexion that appeared subtly brighter, as if I'd dialed up the lighting, Facetune-style, IRL."

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The Natural Face Scrub People on Instagram Are Obsessed With

"[My skin was] crazy smooth thanks to the buffing action of the turmeric, chickpea flour, sea sal...

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7 Woman-Owned Companies You Should Support If You're A Beauty Addict

"YLLO makes the Instagram-famous Tumeric Face Scrub. The product is 100% natural, vegan, gluten-free, cruelty-free, paraben-free, and has no added chemicals or toxins. YLLO also donates 10% of its profits to charities supported by Girls Not Brides working to end child marriage around the globe."

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7 Woman-Owned Companies You Should Support If You're A Beauty Addict

"YLLO makes the Instagram-famous Tumeric Face Scrub. The product is 100% natural, vegan, gluten-f...

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The Newest Skincare Secret Ingredient Comes From Your Spice Rack

"Turns out Turmeric has been used a skincare treatment (and healing remedy, and textile dye) in India for centuries thanks to its anti-oxidant, anti-bacterial, and anti-inflammatory properties. That means it'll soothe irritation, fight off acne, and keep wrinkles at bay. It also stimulates blood flow, which can bring life back into dull, tired skin."

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The Newest Skincare Secret Ingredient Comes From Your Spice Rack

"Turns out Turmeric has been used a skincare treatment (and healing remedy, and textile dye) in I...

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7 Ways Your Beauty Routine Can Empower Other Women

"Traditionally used in South Asian weddings, turmeric is believed to bring good luck to newlyweds—however, in India alone, 47% of girls are married before their 18th birthday. With that in mind, YLLO donates 10% of profits to organizations working to end child marriage around the world."

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7 Ways Your Beauty Routine Can Empower Other Women

"Traditionally used in South Asian weddings, turmeric is believed to bring good luck to newlyweds...

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Real Women, Real Stories: Issue 8

Welcome to Issue 8, featuring Muniba Mazari.   In each Stories Issue, we collect stories from women around the world. These stories are authentic, raw, and unapologetic. They are emotional. They are stories not often told. We hope their stories of strength will spark necessary conversations about child marriage and, most importantly, change these practices for the betterment of women everywhere.   Muniba Mazari Muniba Mazari decided to find her inner strength by using art as a tool after a car accident which left her paralysed, nine years ago. A dreamer, Ms Mazari chose art as a way to break free from the fetters of her physical disability and transcend into the vibrant world of her dreams. Her art is a glimpse into her aspirations in life, her fears and her never fading hope. It is a depiction of memories that may have once haunted her but have now transformed into opportunities, passion and resilience. Source Watch Muniba's story

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Real Women, Real Stories: Issue 8

Welcome to Issue 8, featuring Muniba Mazari.   In each Stories Issue, we collect stories from wo...

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Real Women, Real Stories: Issue 7

Radhika, Girls Not Brides   In each Stories Issue, we collect stories from women around the world. These stories are authentic, raw, and unapologetic. They are emotional. They are stories not often told. We hope their stories of strength will spark necessary conversations about child marriage and, most importantly, change these practices for the betterment of women everywhere.   Radhika, 17 " If I hadn’t got married, maybe I would have become a nurse. But since I got married and left school, I couldn’t follow my dream. " Watch Radhika's story   Lùcia, 15 " I wasn’t sure in the beginning if I wanted this. In the end it wasn’t my decision; everyone convinced me. The family decided this was best. "  Read Núcia's story and more   Reena, 13 " When I was studying in the 9th class, I suddenly got a message that my wedding has been fixed for August 15, 2012. I felt like my dreams had been shattered. My father is very poor. That's why he felt if I got married early, then I will ease the way for my four younger sisters. "  Watch Reena's story

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Real Women, Real Stories: Issue 7

Radhika, Girls Not Brides   In each Stories Issue, we collect stories from women around the worl...

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Real Women, Real Stories: Issue 6

Global Citizen   In each Stories Issue, we collect stories from women around the world. These stories are authentic, raw, and unapologetic. They are emotional. They are stories not often told. We hope their stories of strength will spark necessary conversations about child marriage and, most importantly, change these practices for the betterment of women everywhere.   Beauty and Hope " Beauty and Hope are part of a youth campaign group in Zambia supported by Plan International. They learn about rights and responsibilities and meet with other children, government officials and their local communities to explain why early marriage is harmful. "   Suria " 12 year old Suria started going to a DFID funded safe space last year and is part of the Adolescent Girls Empowerment Programme - an empowerment programme that involves weekly girls group meetings with training on health, life skills and financial education, a voucher for health services, and a girl-friendly savings account. "   Yalemwork " Yalemwork was married when she was just 3 years old but has since become a key advocate for ending child marriage in her community. The UK funded Finote Hiwot programme runs community discussions about early marriage in her village which has resulted in many girls like Yalemwork escaping child marriage. " Taketu " Taketu was married at 14, which is the average age for marriage where she lives in Ethiopia. She didn’t know the man she was forced to marry until the wedding day. Girl Hub are working in the region with policy makers, donors and partners in the private sector to ensure that girls like Taketu are at the heart of the development agenda in Ethiopia. " Bayush and Friends " Education is one of the strongest factors in whether a girl will be forced into early marriage or not. Thanks to grants made available to targeted households, girls like Bayush and her friends have been able to stay in school and avoid child marriage. " Phillimon " Phillimon is the village headman in Chamuka, Zambia and works with paralegals, traditional chiefs and the Community Crime Prevention Unit to take action on preventing early marriages from taking place in the community. "   For the full story, read Child Marriage: 6 beautiful stories of hope by Caroline Dollman

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Real Women, Real Stories: Issue 6

Global Citizen   In each Stories Issue, we collect stories from women around the world. These st...

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Real Women, Real Stories: Issue 5

Rachana Sunar, Oslo Freedom Forum   In each Stories Issue, we collect stories from women around the world. These stories are authentic, raw, and unapologetic. They are emotional. They are stories not often told. We hope their stories of strength will spark necessary conversations about child marriage and, most importantly, change these practices for the betterment of women everywhere.   Education in Afghanistan: Breaking Traditional Barriers " Life is like a guitar. It can play happiness and sadness. You have to listen to both. When I see my situation --- my forced engagement, my school, my community -- I tolerate everything and say to myself that if a person can get an education they can go on to be successful in all aspects of life. "  Read Yalda's story →   From Potential Child Bride to Community Leader " [Forced marriage] means they lose their future. They stop education. They lose their hope for living. And many of them are exposed to rape and domestic violence. This is not a life. It has to change. Girls are girls. Not wives. And it can be changed. "  Listen to Rachana's story →   The Sad Hidden Plight of Child Grooms " Recently I spoke to a school friend who told me he was going to engineering college. The news left me feeling ashamed and pitiful. If our parents had not forced us to marry at such a young age, our lives would be so different. I would have liked to have gone to engineering school. If we were allowed to finish our educations, [my wife] and I would have learned about family planning. Maybe I would have gone to college. Forcing children to marry doesn’t just push them deeper into poverty and threaten their health. It crushes their ambitions—whether they are girls or boys. " Read Pannilal's story →     Child Brides are a Very Real Problem in America Today " One of the reasons my parents couldn’t force me into getting married was that I knew my religion. And in [Islam], it explicitly says that any marriage that is forced is null and void. And there have been cases in our tradition in which a girl has been married without her consent. And she went to the prophet Muhammad, peace be upon him, and asked him, ‘My parents forced me into marriage. Am I a married woman?’ And he said that marriage was not accepted. " Listen to Safia's story →

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Real Women, Real Stories: Issue 5

Rachana Sunar, Oslo Freedom Forum   In each Stories Issue, we collect stories from women around...

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Real Women, Real Stories: Issue 4

Nargis, childmothers.org   In each Stories Issue, we collect stories from women around the world. These stories are authentic, raw, and unapologetic. They are emotional. They are stories not often told. We hope their stories of strength will spark necessary conversations about child marriage and, most importantly, change these practices for the betterment of women everywhere.   This Is The Story of Nargis & Nayeem " Although I knew of the consequences of an early marriage, I still ended up getting married at 14 because my parents are extremely poor. At the time of the wedding, I was very nervous. I didn’t know my husband – even now I don’t know his age. I think he’s around 25 and he works in sales. I didn't want to move into his house. I remember crying a lot. Everyone around me somehow convinced me though. "  Read Nargis and Nayeem's story →   Escaping from North Korea in Search of Freedom " I have to do this because this is not me speaking, this is the people who wanted to tell the world what they want to say. When I was 9 years old I saw my friend's mother publicly executed. Her crime was watching a Hollywood movie. When I was four years old, I was warned by my mother not to even whisper - the birds and the mice could hear me. I admit it: I thought the North Korean dictator could read my mind. "  Listen to Yeonmi's story →   This Is The Story of Thandiwe & Anna " I still don't feel ready to be a mother because I didn’t expect to have a child now. Before I was pregnant, I was in the sixth grade. I wanted to become a chef and work in town. Then I met a boy who was in the ninth grade. We didn’t have a relationship, we only met about five times – that’s all. I was scared when I found out I was pregnant. When my parents knew about it, they brought me to my husband's house and just left me. I didn’t want to go there but they forced me to marry him. " Read Thandiwe and Anna's story →     Child Marriage-Free Zones in Bangladesh " I had to marry my cousin. My grandmother has taken care of me since I was young, so I felt I had to please her. I am not happy. I now have a 6-month old daughter. I had a dream of studying to become a teacher. I would have liked that. " Listen to their stories →

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Real Women, Real Stories: Issue 4

Nargis, childmothers.org   In each Stories Issue, we collect stories from women around the world...

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